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Scope

Friday, October 30, 2020

RILM Abstracts of Music Literature covers all types of publications on music, published anywhere in the world and in any language. The document types covered include all print and digital media.

Publications represented in RILM Abstracts are compiled through a collaborative effort between the International Center RILM’s national committees, and authors who are welcome to submit for indexing the bibliographic information and abstracts concerning their own publications. The over one million records include titles in the original language and English translation, bibliographic information, and abstracts in English and, when available, the language of publication. Records for publications issued in languages using non-roman writing systems (such as Cyrillic, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Korean, and Hebrew) are represented bilingually.

Over the past two decades RILM has dedicated significant additional resources to the coverage of ethnomusicology, popular music, and jazz studies. RILM is also committed to establishing an interdisciplinary context for music studies, and therefore actively tracks publications in a wide range of disciplines that includes anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art history, dance studies, dramatic arts, librarianship, literature, pedagogy, philosophy, physics, psychology, sociology, and therapy. The wide range of music-related topics covered in RILM is reflected in the list of some 2000 music journals represented in the database in addition to about 11,000 journals from other disciplines and fields.

The official scope guidelines of RILM Abstracts are available in English, French, and German

Paralleling breadth in content, RILM Abstracts of Music Literature also offers a full-text enhancement. Both are updated monthly to maximize currency.

RILM Abstracts of Music Literature with Full Text

RILM Abstracts of Music Literature with Full Text expands upon that unrivaled global bibliography of writings on music with the addition of full-text content from 240 periodicals, from 50 countries, published since the early 20th century. Coverage of most periodicals commences with the first issue of the journal run.

RILM Abstracts of Music Literature

RILM Abstracts of Music Literature indexes literature on music published since the early 19th century. Conference proceedings are indexed back to 1835, and Festschriften to 1840. The coverage of music periodicals from before 1967 is coordinated with RIPM Retrospective Index to Music Periodicals in order to avoid possible duplication. To learn more about the RILM-RIPM collaboration, see our jointly created flyer.

RILM Abstracts of Music Literature

Wednesday, August 05, 2020

The unrivaled global bibliography of writings on music, serving the global music research community

1,204,288
Bibliographic Records
1800s-2021
PubLications Covered
394,546
ARTICLES included with fulL text

What is RILM Abstracts of Music Literature?

RILM Abstracts of Music Literature is a comprehensive bibliography of writings about music, featuring bibliographic citations, abstracts, and indexing. It covers publications in all document types from around the world on traditional music, popular music, jazz, classical music, and related subjects.

Available with Full Text

RILM Abstracts of Music Literature with Full Text expands and enhances the unrivaled global bibliography of writings on music with content from nearly 250 key periodicals published from the early 20th century to the present. It offers articles and reviews as well as obituaries, editorials, correspondence, advertisements, and news in full text, which can be searched and browsed for each issue, cover to cover. Each year new journals are being added to the full-text collection.

Topics

RILM Abstracts offers an interdisciplinary context for music studies, and therefore actively tracks publications in a wide range of disciplines that includes anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art history, dance studies, dramatic arts, librarianship, literature, pedagogy, philosophy, physics, psychology, sociology, and therapy.

Languages and Countries

RILM Abstracts covers all types of publications on music, published anywhere in the world and in any language. Records include titles in the original language and English translation, bibliographic information, and abstracts in English and, when available, the language of publication. Records for publications issued in languages using non-roman writing systems (such as Cyrillic, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Korean, and Hebrew) are represented bilingually. The full-text content stems from over 40 countries. Publications represented in RILM Abstracts are compiled through a collaborative effort between the International Center, RILM’s national committees, and authors who are welcome to submit bibliographic information and abstracts of their publications.

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Mélophone, about 1845, Paris, France. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Credits

Trials and Subscriptions

For free trials and subscriptions on EBSCOhost, reach out to EBSCO or contact your EBSCO representative. For personal subscriptions, contact eisindividualsubscriptions@ebsco.com.

Discovery

Find RILM Abstracts on EBSCO Discovery Services.

Full-Text Journals

Download a list of music full-text and non-full text journals included in RILM Abstracts of Music Literature with Full Text.

Scope

RILM Abstracts  covers all types of publications, published anywhere in the world and in any language. These guidelines describe the types of source documents appropriate for inclusion in RILM Abstracts.

The wide range of music-related topics covered in RILM Abstracts is reflected in the list of some 2000 music journals represented in the database in addition to about 11,000 journals from other disciplines and fields.

Searching

The document types covered by RILM Abstracts include all print and digital media. Documents are also grouped under a wide range of document types.

Browse the comprehensive Classification System which groups 99 classes under 16 super classes.

International Center

The RILM International Center in New York City is the organizational hub for the largest music bibliography in the world. Among its principal assets is a staff of experts representing a range of disciplines, languages, and geographic regions. The staff of over 40 includes music specialists from Austria, Brazil, China, Croatia, England, Germany, Honduras, Korea, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Slovakia, Ukraine, and the United States, eleven of whom hold doctorate degrees. Several staff members are multilingual, and many are engaged in a spectrum of musical activities.

Submissions

RILM welcomes submissions by everybody interested in contributing to RILM Abstracts.

Scope Guidelines

Saturday, October 31, 2020

These guidelines describe the types of source documents appropriate for inclusion in RILM Abstracts—referred to in these guidelines as “RILM material”.

RILM material falls into two broad categories: (1) writings and other resources that provide an analysis, show the results of systematic research, or give a critical opinion or interpretation; (2) writings and other resources that provide important source material (including but not limited to correspondence, interviews, obituaries, conference reports, criticism, and biographies). RILM material can be published in any format.

Many musical fields rely on publications that are traditionally scholarly in nature, while others—especially those related to current musical life—have come to rely on a broader range of publications for much of their source material. Inclusion decisions should take this into account, bearing in mind that publications relied upon by music scholars are appropriate for inclusion in RILM Abstracts.

Document types of RILM material

RILM Abstracts includes all writings and resources likely to be of value to music researchers, whether printed, digital, or in any other format. The first priority is to cover the most important and scholarly items from all subject areas. While RILM material appears in different publication types from one country to the next, in general, priority will be given to core journal articles, monographs, essay collections, conference proceedings, Festschriften, dissertations, and theses.

Periodical coverage

All periodical articles on music and related disciplines are considered to be RILM material. Given the vastness and variation of this literature, the following coverage priorities have been established. The first three categories (core, secondary, and tertiary) pertain specifically to music journals and represent a descending order of priority.

Core journals: These are flagship journals of music studies; all articles are abstracted and all book reviews are cited (film and sound recording reviews are cited at the discretion of RILM editors). Core status is assigned to journals by the national committees, which thereby commit to fully abstracting them and in a timely manner. The RILM International Center may also assign core status to a journal, particularly (but not exclusively) for journals published in countries with no national committee; in such cases, staff editors at the Center abstract the journal. The International Center may also remove the core status of a journal if it is not being covered consistently. All core journal issues should be available to staff editors at the International Center.

Secondary journals: These are also deemed significant for music studies. They are systematically scanned for articles that fall within RILM’s scope guidelines, and these articles are abstracted. Secondary status is assigned primarily by national committees, which thereby commit to scanning each issue, upon publication, for RILM content, and abstracting that content. The International Center may also assign secondary status, or, if a title is not being systematically scanned and abstracted, it may remove secondary status. Wherever possible, secondary journal issues should be available to staff editors at the International Center.

Tertiary journals: These are less oriented toward music scholarship. They are not systematically scanned, and their contents are abstracted selectively.

Other disciplines: Articles on music from multi-disciplinary and other non-music journals are also entered into the database by the national committees, authors, and RILM International Center staff.

The four categories described above are for periodical articles in any media. If the article is part of an electronic journal or website, the following criteria must be met: (1) there is a procedure in place for archiving the journal or site; (2) there is an editorial policy in place; (3) the journal is published regularly; (4) the journal has a publisher (that is, it is not self- or editor-published).

An abstract for an entire issue of a periodical is to be sent to the International Center if it is a special issue devoted to a particular topic and is designated as a “thematic” issue in its title or on its title page or spine.

Publishers are invited to submit their periodicals to RILM International Center in order to have their content included in RILM abstracts.

Collections (Festschriften, conference proceedings, collections of essays)

RILM material includes collections of essays, Festschriften, and conference proceedings. For such collections, a citation (with or without abstract) must be provided for the collection as a whole (a cover record), and each individual article must also receive a citation and an abstract (analytic records). National committees must strive to include a record for every article when the collection is entirely devoted to music, ensuring the inclusion of complete collections in RILM Abstracts. In cases where only some of the articles pertain to music, a cover record for the collection is required, as well as individual citations and (where possible) abstracts for each music-related item only. Collections of articles by a single author should include an abstract for each article separately.

Monographs and other books

Besides original monographs, RILM material includes facsimiles of literature on music (reproductions of early printed editions or manuscripts), reprints, new or revised editions, translations, and catalogues of exhibitions.

Dissertations and theses

RILM material includes doctoral level (or highest postgraduate degree level) dissertations in music and in other disciplines when they concern music. Master’s level or other student theses are included when they contain significant new information or a new interpretation, and are publicly available.

Electronic resources

RILM material includes electronic resources that are of value to researchers, including, but not limited to, websites, blogs, podcasts, databases, CD-ROMs, and other media.

Reviews

RILM includes reviews of any material that falls within its scope. In general, reviews that describe or critically assess a given publication are included; those that merely mention a publication’s existence are not. All reviews listed in core and secondary journals should be included without exception.

Technical drawings of historical instruments

Special caution is to be applied in reviewing the following kinds of materials for inclusion in RILM Abstracts:

  • Editions of music (including facsimiles) should be entered only when they include substantial written material (scholarly apparatus, source studies, notes on performance). 
  • Articles from daily newspapers and magazines only when they offer important information not available elsewhere, such as obituaries, or are major critical articles that include results of original research. 
  • Program notes, pamphlets, brochures, and other small separate publications only if they are of particular importance to music researchers and are publicly available. 
  • Sound and video recordings only when one or more of the following criteria are met: (1) when the recording or film is important source material for ethnomusicological, popular, or performance studies; (2) when the recording is accompanied by substantial written material; or (3) when the recording or film is the subject of a review. 
  • Feature films that claim biographical authority should be included. 
  • Reviews of concerts only when the review itself can be considered RILM material and is therefore of particular importance to music researchers.

RILM Abstracts excludes writings unlikely to be of value to music researchers, including the following:

  • Practical manuals and “how-to” books, unless they are modern editions of important historic texts, have received substantial reviews, or are otherwise of particular value to music researchers.
  • Rudimentary instructional manuals, with the same exceptions as above.
  • Outlines for classroom use. Reviews that are merely publication announcements.

Subject categories of RILM material

RILM Abstracts includes writings and other resources on music and related disciplines, including the following:

  • Historical musicology
  • Ethnomusicology, including reviews of sound and video recordings in RILM core periodicals
  • Popular music and jazz
  • Theory, analysis, and composition
  • Sound sources, instruments, their techniques, reprints of historical teaching methods and treatises, makers, technical drawings of historical instruments.
  • Performance practice and notation
  • Pedagogy
  • Reference and research materials, including catalogues of temporary exhibitions and permanent museum collections, discographies, directories, encyclopedias, bibliographies, composers’ work lists issued by music publishers, and library catalogues. Research material available on websites should be included.
  • Music and other arts, including but not limited to dance, dramatic arts, poetry and literature (including novels about composers written with biographical authority, if reviewed in a music periodical covered in RILM abstracts), items on music iconography, and music and art
  • Music and related disciplines, including but not limited to philosophy, aesthetics, criticism, psychology, hearing, perception, physiology, therapy, medicine, archaeology, anthropology, engineering, sound recording, acoustics, architecture, computers, sociology, linguistics, semiotics, printing, engraving, publishing, economics, copyright, and other legal matters
  • Music in liturgy and ritual

Products

Tuesday, October 27, 2020
ProductDescriptionContent DetailsInquiries & SuggestionsTrials &
Subscriptions
A comprehensive bibliography of writings on music serving the global music research community that covers all types of print and digital publications on music and related disciplines, published anywhere in the world and in any language.Three downloadable lists of journals, in Excel or HTMLemail us
The full-text enhancement of the unrivaled global bibliography of writings on music that enhances RILM Abstracts with periodicals from around the world.  New journals are being added to the full-text collection annually.Full title list of full-text journals, searchable by various criteriaemail us
The ever-expanding full-text compilation of reference works. This continually expanding collection of reference works from various periods and places provides comprehensive coverage of the most important fields and subject areas of music research.Full title list of encyclopedias, downloadable in Excel; full list of article titlesemail us

The preeminent digital encyclopedia for music researchers worldwide, containing the second edition of Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart  along with new and substantially updated content covering many topics in music and related fields.Full list of article titlesemail us
The digital finding aid for locating musical works contained in printed collections, sets, and series, indexing individual pieces of music printed in the complete works of composers, anthologies of music, and other scholarly editions, providing a granular level of detail about each piece.email us

Document Types

Friday, October 30, 2020

Documents are grouped under a wide range of document types.

Document types

AB – Article in a periodical treated as a book
AC – Article in a collection or critical edition
AD – Article in a dictionary
AE – Article in a Festschrift
AG – Article in a blog
AK – Article in a periodical: music work
AL – Article in a newsletter
AM – Article in a magazine
AN – Article in a newspaper
AP – Article in a periodical
AS – Article in a symposium/conference proceedings
AW – Article in an edition of music
EA – Article in an electronic resource

BC – Collection of essays
BD – Encyclopedia or dictionary
BE – Festschrift
BF – Facsimile or reprint edition
BG – BlogBM – Monograph
BP – Periodical (thematic issue)
BS – Symposium proceedings
BT – Translation
BX – Textbook

MP – Motion picture
MR – Sound recording

CP – Program notes
CR – Recording notes
CS – Commentary apart from edition
CW – Edition of music

DD – Doctoral dissertation
DM – Non-doctoral thesis

EP – Podcast
ER – Electronic resource
JZ – Fanzine
MD – Technical drawing of instruments
PM – Printed music contained in a collection

RA – Review of an article
RB – Review of a book
RC – Review of a collection
RD – Review of a dissertation
RE – Review of a Festschrift
RF – Review of a facsimile or reprint
RM – Review of an edition of music
RN – Review of a technical drawing
RP – Review of a periodical
RR – Review of a recording
RS – Review of a symposium proceedings
RT – Review of a translation
RV – Review of a motion picture
RX – Review of an electronic resource

Journal Titles

Friday, October 30, 2020

RILM Abstracts extensively covers journals, the titles of which can be browsed on this page.

Coverage policy defines three priorities for journals; the first two—core and secondary—pertain specifically to music journals.

Core journals. These are flagship journals of music studies; all articles are abstracted and all reviews are cited (with the exception of film and sound recording reviews, which are cited at the discretion of RILM national committees or staff editors).

Secondary journals. These are also deemed significant for music studies. They are systematically scanned for articles that fall within the scope guidelines, and these articles are abstracted.

Other journals. These include music journals that are less oriented toward music scholarship and are not systematically scanned as well as multi-disciplinary and other non-music journals that may occasionally have an article related to music. Coverage is selective.

Journal Titles in Full Text

Friday, October 30, 2020

RILM Abstracts with Full Text (RAFT) provides the same coverage as RILM Abstracts with the addition of the complete full text for several hundred of the music journals. These journals are fully searchable and browsable, cover to cover. Find a listing of all journals included in RILM Abstracts and RAFT under Journal Titles. Find all full-text journals included in RAFT by title, publisher, country, language, priority, and ISSN by using the search tool below.

Classification System

Friday, October 30, 2020

RILM’s comprehensive Classification System which groups 99 classes under 16 super classes.

Super Classes

Reference and Research Materials

  • 1 Bibliography and librarianship
  • 2 Libraries, museums, collections
  • 3 Encyclopedias and dictionaries
  • 4 Catalogues (library, museum, or exhibition)
  • 5 Catalogues, thematic
  • 6 Bibliographies, general
  • 7 Bibliographies, music
  • 8 Bibliographies, music literature
  • 9 Discographies and filmographies
  • 10 Iconographies
  • 11 Chronologies and almanacs
  • 12 Directories and membership lists

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Imaginative literature

  • 13 Imaginative literature (includes film)

Collected Writings

  • 14 Periodicals and yearbooks
  • 15 Festschriften
    • 15.0 Festschriften (general items)
    • 15.1 Individuals15.2 Choral societies
    • 15.3 Instrumental ensembles
    • 15.4 Music associations, composers’ societies, Musikvereine
    • 15.5 Academic institutions, libraries
    • 15.6 Festivals, exhibitions, congresses
    • 15.7 Theaters and opera ensembles
    • 15.8 Publishers and printers, music stores, record labels, journals, newspapers
    • 15.9 Instrument manufacturers
    • 15.10 Non-music secular and religious institutions; countries, cities, monasteries
  • 16 Congress reports, symposium proceedings
  • 17 Essays and documents

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Universal Perspectives

  • 19 Universal Perspectives, general (historical/ethnographical)

Western Art Music

  • 20 The discipline
  • 21 History, general
  • 22 Antiquity
  • 23 Middle Ages
  • 24 Renaissance
  • 25 Baroque
  • 26 Classic
  • 27 Romantic and post-Romantic
  • 28 Twentieth and 21st century (history)
  • 29 Twentieth and 21st century (musical life)

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Traditional Music and Non-Western Art Music

  • 30 Ethnomusicology, the discipline
  • 31 General
  • 32 Africa
  • 33 Asia. General
    • 33.1 Asia. Traditional music
    • 33.2 Asia. History of music
  • 34 Europe
  • 35 North America (North of Mexico)
  • 36 South and Central America, Mexico, and the Caribbean
  • 37 Oceania, Australia, New Zealand

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Jazz and Blues

  • 38 Jazz and Blues
  • 39 Popular Music
    • 39.0 General
    • 39.2 Africa (general)
      • 39.21 North Africa
      • 39.22 Sub-Saharan Africa
    • 39.3 Asia
      • 39.31 East Asia (includes Mongolia and Sibir’)
      • 39.32 South Asia
      • 39.33 Southeast Asia
    • 39.4 Europe
    • 39.5 North America (north of Mexico)
    • 39.6 Mexico, Caribbean, Central America, South America
    • 39.7 Australia, New Zealand, Oceania

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Sound Sources

  • 40 General (including conducting, organology)
    • 40.0 Sound sources (general)
    • 40.1 Organology as discipline
    • 40.2 Conducting
    • 40.3 Orchestra
  • 41 Voice (including choral ensembles)
    • 41.0 General
    • 41.2 Africa (general)
      • 41.21 North Africa
      • 41.22 Sub-Saharan Africa
    • 41.3 Asia
      • 41.31 East Asia (includes Mongolia and Sibir’)
      • 41.32 South Asia
      • 41.33 Southeast Asia
    • 41.4 Europe
    • 41.5 North America (north of Mexico)
    • 41.6 Mexico, Caribbean, Central America, South America
    • 41.7 Australia, New Zealand, Oceania
  • 42 Keyboard, organ
  • 43 Keyboard, general
  • 44 String (chordophones)
    • 44.0 General
    • 44.2 Africa (general)
      • 44.21 North Africa
      • 44.22 Sub-Saharan Africa
    • 44.3 Asia
      • 44.31 East Asia (includes Mongolia and Sibir’)
      • 44.32 South Asia
      • 44.33 Southeast Asia
    • 44.4 Europe
    • 44.5 North America (north of Mexico)
    • 44.6 Mexico, Caribbean, Central America, South America
    • 44.7 Australia, New Zealand, Oceania
  • 45 Wind (aerophones)
    • 45.0 General
    • 45.2 Africa (general)
      • 45.21 North Africa
      • 45.22 Sub-Saharan Africa
    • 45.3 Asia
      • 45.31 East Asia (includes Mongolia and Sibir’)
      • 45.32 South Asia
      • 45.33 Southeast Asia
    • 45.4 Europe
    • 45.5 North America (north of Mexico)
    • 45.6 Mexico, Caribbean, Central America, South America
    • 45.7 Australia, New Zealand, Oceania
  • 46 Percussion (membranophones, idiophones)
    • 46.0 General
    • 46.2 Africa (general)
      • 46.21 North Africa
      • 46.22 Sub-Saharan Africa
    • 46.3 Asia
      • 46.31 East Asia (includes Mongolia and Sibir’)
      • 46.32 South Asia
      • 46.33 Southeast Asia
    • 46.4 Europe
    • 46.5 North America (north of Mexico)
    • 46.6 Mexico, Caribbean, Central America, South America
    • 46.7 Australia, New Zealand, Oceania
  • 47 Mechanical
  • 48 Electrophones (synthesized sound)

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Sound Art and New Media

  • 49.1 Sound art
  • 49.2 Digital and multimedia art

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Performance Practice, Notation, and Editing

  • 50 Performance practice, general
  • 51 Performance practice, to ca. 1600
  • 52 Performance practice, ca. 1600-1825
  • 53 Performance practice, ca. 1800-1900
  • 54 Performance practice, 20th & 21st centuries
  • 55 Notation and paleography
  • 56 Improvisation
  • 58 Editing

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Theory, Analysis, and Composition

  • 60 Theory, general
  • 61 Rhythm, meter, tempo
  • 62 Tuning, temperament, scale structures
  • 63 Harmony, counterpoint, voice-leading (tonal and nontonal)
  • 64 Form and genre
  • 65 Sound color, texture, register
  • 66 Style analysis
  • 67 Structural analysis
  • 68 Computer and electronic composition
  • 69 Melody and motive

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Pedagogy

  • 70 General
  • 71 Preschool, primary, and secondary schools
  • 72 Colleges and universities
  • 73 Conservatories and other professional training
  • 74 Music education for amateurs

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Music and the Other Arts

  • 75 General
  • 76 Dance
    • 76.0 General
    • 76.1 Dance studies as discipline
      • 76.21 Ballet
      • 76.29 All post-ballet developments (parallel to classes 28 & 29)
      • 76.30 Social dance, general
      • 76.32 Social dance, Africa
      • 76.33 Social dance, Asia
      • 76.34 Social dance, Europe
      • 76.35 Social dance, North America (north of Mexico)
      • 76.36 Social dance, Mexico, Caribbean, Central America, South America
      • 76.37 Social dance, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania
      • 76.38 Jazz and musical theater
      • 76.39 Popular stage dance & music video
      • 76.40 Traditional theatrical dance, general
      • 76.42 Traditional theatrical dance, Africa
      • 76.43 Traditional theatrical dance, Asia
      • 76.44 Traditional theatrical dance, Europe
      • 76.45 Traditional theatrical dance, North America (north of Mexico)
      • 76.46 Traditional theatrical dance, Mexico, Caribbean, Central America, South America
      • 76.47 Traditional theatrical dance, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania
  • 77 Dramatic arts
    • 77.0 General
    • 77.1 Theater studies as discipline
      • 77.11 Opera
      • 77.12 Popular musical theater
      • 77.13 Libretto
      • 77.14 Film and television
      • 77.15 Music video
      • 77.16 Multimedia theater
      • 77.17 Incidental music
      • 77.18 Set designing, staging, directing
      • 77.30 Traditional dramatic arts, general
      • 77.32 Traditional dramatic arts, Africa
      • 77.33 Traditional dramatic arts, Asia
      • 77.34 Traditional dramatic arts, Europe
      • 77.35 Traditional dramatic arts, North America (north of Mexico)
      • 77.36 Traditional dramatic arts, Mexico, Caribbean, Central America, South American
      • 77.37 Traditional dramatic arts, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania
  • 78 Literature
    • 78.0 General
    • 78.1 Literature studies as discipline
    • 78.2 Song texts
      • 78.31 Traditional literature & epics, general
      • 78.32 Traditional literature & epics, Africa
      • 78.33 Traditional literature & epics, Asia
      • 78.34 Traditional literature & epics, Europe
      • 78.35 Traditional literature & epics, North America (north of Mexico)
      • 78.36 Traditional literature & epics, Mexico, Caribbean, Central America, South America
      • 78.37 Traditional literature & epics, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania
  • 79 Visual arts (including iconography)

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  • 80 General
  • 81 Philosophy, aesthetics, criticism
  • 82 Psychology and hearing
  • 83 Physiology, therapy, medicine
  • 84 Archaeology
  • 85 Engineering and sound recording; computers
  • 86 Physics, mathematics, acoustics, architecture
  • 87 Social sciences
    • 87.1 Sociology and cultural Studies
    • 87.2 Anthropology and ethnology
    • 87.3 Economics
    • 87.4 Politics and political Science
    • 87.5 Sound studies
    • 87.6 Cultural geography
    • 87.7 Gender and sexuality studies
    • 87.8 Ethnic and racial studies
    • 87.9 Media studies and popular culture studies
  • 88 Linguistics and semiotics
  • 89 Printing, publishing, music business
    • 89.0 General
    • 89.1 Printing
    • 89.2 Music industry
    • 89.3 Law

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Music in Liturgy and Ritual

  • 90 Religion, general
    • 90.0 General
    • 90.1 Liturgical studies as discipline
    • 90.2 Christianity, general
  • 91 Jewish
  • 92 Byzantine and Eastern Orthodox
  • 93 Roman Catholic
  • 94 Protestant
    • 94.0 General
    • 94.1 Lutheran group
    • 94.2 Calvinist group
    • 94.3 Anabaptist group
    • 94.4 Anglican/Episcopal group
    • 94.5 Baptist group
    • 94.6 Methodist group
    • 94.7 Pentecostal group
    • 94.8 Adventist group
  • 95 Buddhist
  • 96 Hindu
  • 97 Islamic
  • 99 Other
    • 99.1 General
    • 99.2 Africa
    • 99.3 Asia (includes Central Asia)
      • 99.31 East Asia (includes Mongolia and Sibir’)
      • 99.32 South Asia
      • 99.33 Southeast Asia
    • 99.5 North America (north of Mexico)
    • 99.6 Mexico, Caribbean, Central America, South America
    • 99.7 Australia, New Zealand, Oceania

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International Center

Friday, October 30, 2020

The RILM International Center in New York City is the organizational hub for the largest music bibliography in the world. Among its principal assets is a staff of experts representing a range of disciplines, languages, and geographic regions. The staff of over 40 includes music specialists from Austria, Brazil, China, Croatia, England, Germany, Honduras, Korea, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Slovakia, Ukraine, and the United States, eleven of whom hold doctorate degrees. Several staff members are multilingual, and many are engaged in a spectrum of musical activities.

Bibliographic records arrive at the International Center in several forms: Committees enter them directly into RILM’s custom-built bibliographic database known as iBis (Internet Bibliographic Indexing System) or send them on paper, in specially tagged digital flat files, or as tagged MARC formatted records downloaded from library catalogues. Authors can also submit records for their publications through RILM’s online submission forms. Finally, RILM has access to several hundred music journals either through print copies received at the International Center or through online repositories; these journals are examined at the office, and relevant material is accessed into the bibliographic database.

The editorial staff comprises Assistant Editors and Editors. The responsibility of Assistant Editors is to verify the accuracy of bibliographic information in records created by RILM committees and submitted by authors, and to enter new records from journals and books that are sent to the office. Records entered into the database do not appear in the RILM online user interface until their bibliographic information is thoroughly checked by Assistant Editors.

Editors work on already-accessed bibliographic records, writing abstracts when needed, translating abstracts that arrive at the International Center in other languages, and providing records with indexing. Their work follows highly detailed standards, and includes a rigorous verification process for all names, institutions, dates, and concepts.

Members of the editorial staff also dedicate their time to tracking current musicological publications to find material that has not yet been entered into the database; organizing and working with the national RILM committees; developing and maintaining the thesaurus; defining indexing concepts and writing scope notes reflecting changes in the current music scholarship; and expanding equivalencies of terms and names to facilitate a better user experience in searching the database.

About one-third of these records are submitted by RILM’s national committees and individual authors, and about two-thirds are produced at the International Center. The countries with the largest musicological production—and, by extension, the committees with the most work—are China, the U.S., Germany, and Russia. The Chinese and Russian records are particularly complex, because RILM produces bilingual information for publications in all languages using non-roman writing systems. Personal and institutional names in such records require particularly laborious procedures, since their equivalencies are rendered in various transliteration styles.

A number of staff members deal with technological aspects of RILM’s work, such as developing the editorial interface and establishing tools for working with metadata. From its beginning in the 1960s, RILM has always eagerly embraced vanguard computer technologies both for the work of its editors and for the presentation of its database to its users. RILM was already using mainframe computers for the production of its database in 1969, and made its data available for electronic search through the Lockheed Information Sciences Laboratory in Palo Alto in 1979, long before the Internet was commercialized in 1995. This spirit is constantly maintained in the International Office, and more recently most of RILM’s cutting-edge computer applications have been developed in-house.

Training new Editors and Assistant Editors is a relatively long process. The new employee needs to become familiar with RILM’s database and the exacting editorial policies and strategies that RILM applies to a profusion of bibliographic information.

Since its foundation RILM’s International Center has been based at the City University of New York. For a short period of time the office was located at Queens College, but since 1968 it has been at the CUNY Graduate Center. Our current home is on the third floor of the Graduate Center’s building, just opposite the Empire State Building on Fifth Avenue in New York City. We welcome scholars passing through to visit us here, to see the site of our operations and have a conversation about their writings and the scholarship in their countries, enhancing our ability to represent the field in RILM’s products.

Global Network

Friday, October 30, 2020

The greater RILM organization is a global network of national committees in over 40 countries that are responsible for ensuring that all significant writings on music published in their respective countries or regions are represented in RILM Abstracts of Music Literature and RILM Abstracts of Music Literature with Full Text; these committees are composed of musicologists and librarians based at major universities, national libraries, and research institutes.

Africa Guatamala Russia
Armenia Hong Kong Serbia
Austria Hungary Slovakia
Belgium Ireland Slovenia
Boznia and Herzogovina Israel South Africa
Brazil Italy Spain
Canada Japan Sweden
Croatia Latvia Switzerland
Czech Republic Lithuania Taiwan
Denmark Macedonia Turkey
Estonia New Zealand United Kingdom
France Norway United States
Germany Poland
Greece Portugal